Todd's Blog
Stop SOPA, PIPA, and OPEN! 
Stand with me and the countless others, fellow internet users, as we say no to limitations and communism this March.  I encourage EVERYONE to partake in Black March.  For all who do, you have my thanks.

Stop SOPA, PIPA, and OPEN! 

Stand with me and the countless others, fellow internet users, as we say no to limitations and communism this March.  I encourage EVERYONE to partake in Black March.  For all who do, you have my thanks.

http://thatguywiththeglasses.com/videolinks/teamt/paw/specials/16364-dragonball-evolution

(This video is very long so I wouldn’t recommend watching the entire length.)

This video uses visual rhetoric to keep the watcher’s attention for a long period of time.  During the moments with the reviewers, the camera zooms in during dramatic parts and even closer when something is about to happen.  This is pretty common in movies, as well.  The camera is zoomed out on everyone not only to show their synchronized reactions, but also to call attention to drastic motions of the hands and body to express emotions.  This is best done using disgusted facial expressions, which is best done when zoomed in an appropriate level on the face.  During the clips being reviewed, humorous elements most can relate to are edited in, as well as the accompanying sounds.  When objects are out of place, such as glasses, it can be assumed that something violent has happened.  Camera flashes signify a fast event, such as a hit.  When the camera isn’t steady, it is assumed that the person being recorded is trying to escape from something terrifying.  Showing only outstretched hands tells you that this person has been caught, but is still trying to escape.

The above image represents America’s influence on Japan’s culture.  KFC, an American company, is extremely popular during Christmas time, a holiday practiced by a large number of Americans.  Eating KFC for a Christmas dinner has become a tradition.  This is a blend of cultures due to Japanese Christians wanting a traditional dinner of turkey, but not being able to find anything, went for the next best option - fried chicken.  It wasn’t long before Christmas was commercialized and light-hanging and gift-exchanging became common.
When thinking of the future of America, the thoughts that come to mind don’t seem too different from the thoughts of today.  Although this generation has been influenced by outside cultures, these influences seem to be passed off as “American” due to America’s conversion of the product.  For example, the TV shows “Pokemon” or “Dragon Ball Z” have been viewed, at least in small amounts, by this generation.  In fact, every male I’ve ever asked has seen one of the two!  While these shows were a Japanese influence, many passed them off as “American” due to the voice actors speaking English, using an American comedic relief style (as opposed to the original Japanese style), and seeing that it’s visible audience was American.  This may be subconsciously done due to a sense of patriotism.  Americans are often represented as wanting to support American companies.  The “we look after our own” attitude may be being passed down in a negative sense, labeling foreign influences as outsiders.  The result - making those influences more American.  I do not foresee America being assimilated any time in my lifetime.

The above image represents America’s influence on Japan’s culture.  KFC, an American company, is extremely popular during Christmas time, a holiday practiced by a large number of Americans.  Eating KFC for a Christmas dinner has become a tradition.  This is a blend of cultures due to Japanese Christians wanting a traditional dinner of turkey, but not being able to find anything, went for the next best option - fried chicken.  It wasn’t long before Christmas was commercialized and light-hanging and gift-exchanging became common.

When thinking of the future of America, the thoughts that come to mind don’t seem too different from the thoughts of today.  Although this generation has been influenced by outside cultures, these influences seem to be passed off as “American” due to America’s conversion of the product.  For example, the TV shows “Pokemon” or “Dragon Ball Z” have been viewed, at least in small amounts, by this generation.  In fact, every male I’ve ever asked has seen one of the two!  While these shows were a Japanese influence, many passed them off as “American” due to the voice actors speaking English, using an American comedic relief style (as opposed to the original Japanese style), and seeing that it’s visible audience was American.  This may be subconsciously done due to a sense of patriotism.  Americans are often represented as wanting to support American companies.  The “we look after our own” attitude may be being passed down in a negative sense, labeling foreign influences as outsiders.  The result - making those influences more American.  I do not foresee America being assimilated any time in my lifetime.

After seeing the Mario Kart video today, I figured I would share this.

Bacteria Salad

This game requires some figuring out.  Even the directions don’t properly describe how to play it.  I did the easiest difficulty and still had to pay attention to it at all times.  The basis of it is that you are a farmer and distribute your own crops.  Based on the size of your farm (how many individual farms you line up next to each other) you can produce more crops, but also risk infection spreading to your other crops at a faster rate.  Therefore, meaning that small crops equal small risks, but less money.  If your crops are infected, you have to take all of your crops off of the shelves, meaning no money, while you find and destroy the infected crop/crops. 

Bacteria Salad is persuasive mainly because of how infection spreads to bigger farms.  This says that bigger farms are more dangerous than smaller farms and that our food should come from smaller farms to cut down the chances of disease spreading.  This game basically says, “The smaller, the better,” and leads you to make these decisions for yourself by making it difficult to successfully supply crops from a large farm.

When browsing under the tag “metal” through tumblr, lots of pictures of shows, people at shows, and people recording themselves playing metal.  Ironically, most of these posts are not what traditional metalheads would view as “metal” posts.  While this isn’t helpful in an informative sense, it shows that there is a lot of debate about what metal is and how the public metal scene is viewed compared to a more traditional, now underground, scene.  It also shows a link between metalheads and songs which no one views as metal.  People are taking light songs, such as “Rolling In the Deep” and trying to turn them into metal songs.  This shows that metalheads are also involved in a non-metal scene, which may not be realized by those who view metal negatively.Wikipedia is a more information-based source.  It goes over a summary of metal, how it started, where it’s gone, but in terms of how it’s been viewed, there isn’t too much information.  At least not to the level which I want it.  It does, however, show how metal has evolved, along with different descriptions of metal subgenres, which will be useful for a basis in my paper.Picture relates, a humorous metal band which performs “Pirate metal” as a parody of “Viking metal”.

When browsing under the tag “metal” through tumblr, lots of pictures of shows, people at shows, and people recording themselves playing metal.  Ironically, most of these posts are not what traditional metalheads would view as “metal” posts.  While this isn’t helpful in an informative sense, it shows that there is a lot of debate about what metal is and how the public metal scene is viewed compared to a more traditional, now underground, scene.  It also shows a link between metalheads and songs which no one views as metal.  People are taking light songs, such as “Rolling In the Deep” and trying to turn them into metal songs.  This shows that metalheads are also involved in a non-metal scene, which may not be realized by those who view metal negatively.
Wikipedia is a more information-based source.  It goes over a summary of metal, how it started, where it’s gone, but in terms of how it’s been viewed, there isn’t too much information.  At least not to the level which I want it.  It does, however, show how metal has evolved, along with different descriptions of metal subgenres, which will be useful for a basis in my paper.
Picture relates, a humorous metal band which performs “Pirate metal” as a parody of “Viking metal”.

Metal \m/

For my research paper, I will be looking into how metal has been viewed in the past, how it is viewed today, and how core genres have effected how metal is viewed, both from the perspective of a core fan and a traditional metalhead.  Metal has always been viewed as a more evil genre by certain audiences and I think it would be interesting to discover why this is when other genres discuss the same concepts.

I think the key to representing this topic in a fair light is diversity.  I will be interviewing multiple people with different perspectives to see how metal is viewed within different sub-metal genres and non-metal genres.  I also plan on researching metal more using books or articles to find periods of time where the views of metal flourished. I may also use documentaries on general metal for research.

I think it will be fairly simple to talk about metal for 2,500 words.  It is a controversial subject that has many discussions within in, which I feel strongly for.  The most difficult part of this project may be determining just what the “average” crowd of non-metalheads is.

(Different opinions in the world on having naturally balanced sexes.)

(Different opinions in the world on having naturally balanced sexes.)

(How metal has developed as a genre.  How metal was viewed in the past compared to how it is viewed now.)

(How metal has developed as a genre.  How metal was viewed in the past compared to how it is viewed now.)